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Saturday, February 13, 2016

Chopped Salad With Apples Walnuts and Bitter Lettuces






The best place for a salad on the Thanksgiving menu is at the beginning of the meal, before everybody fills up. We often pass around plates of this vegetarian chopped salad (no bacon) to accompany the drinks before we sit down at the table. The salad is a great mix of bitter and sweet flavors, juicy and crunchy, and comforting, too. Sweet/tart, crisp juicy apples like Braeburns, Jonagolds, Honey Crisp and Granny Smith work well here.

Featured in:  Apples From Thanksgiving Start To Finish. 
  Time 20 minutes
 Yield 6 to 8 servings
92 ratings *****


Ingredients
For the dressing
1 tablespoon sherry vinegar or champagne vinegar
1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 small garlic clove, green shoot removed, puréed (optional)
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
 Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
2 tablespoons walnut oil
5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
For the salad
4 to 5 cups chopped bitter lettuces such as radicchio, endive or escarole [220 - 275 g]
2 crisp, tart, juicy apples, cut in small dice (1/4 inch)
½ cup chopped walnuts [50 g]
½ cup crumbled blue cheese or feta [100 g]
¼ cup chopped fresh parsley or a mix of parsley, chives and tarragon

Preparation
1. In a small bowl or measuring cup, whisk together vinegars, lemon juice, garlic, mustard, salt and pepper. Whisk in walnut oil and olive oil.
2. Combine all of the salad ingredients in a large bowl. Toss with dressing until well coated, and serve.
Advance preparation: The salad is best tossed and served right away, but it has good staying power and won’t suffer if it sits for an hour before serving. The dressing can be made a day ahead and refrigerated. Let it come to room temperature before dressing the salad.

Nutritional information per serving (6 servings)
285 calories; 25 grams fat; 5 grams saturated fat; 9 grams polyunsaturated fat; 11 grams monounsaturated fat; 8 milligrams cholesterol; 12 milligrams carbohydrates; 3 grams dietary fiber; 203 milligrams sodium (does not include salt to taste); 5 grams protein

http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1016989-chopped-salad-with-apples-walnuts-and-bitter-lettuces

Cinnamon Sugar Almonds






A vegan treat of homemade cinnamon and sugar coated almonds – a simple yet elegant twist of salty and sweet.

Featured in:  Vegetarian Thanksgiving: Skyping The Holiday Meal. 
  Time 15 minutes
 Yield 8 servings
9 ratings ****

 
Ingredients
2 cups almonds [200 g]
1 cup sugar [200 g]
1 tablespoon cinnamon
½ cup water [125 ml]

Preparation
1. Combine all ingredients in a saucepan over medium heat, and stir constantly until the water has evaporated and the nuts are covered in a totally dry coating, roughly 15 minutes. Transfer almonds to a plate lined with wax paper and allow to cool.

http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1016981-cinnamon-sugar-almonds 

Cornmeal and Buckwheat Blueberry Muffins






  Time 40 minutes
 Yield 12 muffins (1/3 cup tins) or 18 mini muffins
20 ratings ****


They are the antithesis of the cakey blueberry muffins you find in coffee shops. The berry quotient is generous here. If you find the buckwheat flavor too strong, swap flip the amounts of whole- wheat flour with the amount of and buckwheat flours (that is, use 125 grams whole- wheat and 65 grams buckwheat).

Featured in:  Blueberries For All. 

Ingredients
65 grams whole- wheat flour (1/2 cup, approximately)
125 grams buckwheat flour (1 cup, approximately)
4 grams salt (rounded 1/2 teaspoon)
15 grams baking powder (1 tablespoon)
2 grams baking soda (1/2 teaspoon)
85 grams cornmeal (1/2 cup, approximately)
2 eggs
360 grams buttermilk (1 1/2 cups) or kefir
75 grams mild honey, such as clover (3 tablespoons)
50 grams canola or grape seed oil (1/4 cup)
250 grams blueberries, or a mix of blueberries and blackberries (1 3/4 cups, approximately)

Preparation
1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Oil or butter muffin tins. Sift together whole wheat flour, buckwheat flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda into a medium bowl. Stir in cornmeal.
2. In a separate large bowl whisk eggs with buttermilk or kefir, honey, and oil. Quickly stir in flour mixture. Fold in berries.
3. Using a spoon, measuring cup or ice cream scoop, fill muffin cups to the top. Bake 25 minutes, or until lightly browned and well risen. Remove from the oven and if muffins come out of the tins easily, remove from tins and allow to cool on a rack. If they don’t release easily, allow to cool in tins, then remove from tins.

http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1016381-cornmeal-and-buckwheat-blueberry-muffins

Cornmeal Plum Scones






Scones with jam is classic. But in most cases the jam is served alongside; here, we’ve baked it right into the pastry. This recipe calls for a whipping up a quickly made plum and honey jam scented with bay leaf (you can substitute a rosemary sprig or cinnamon stick if you’d rather). If that seems like one step too many, use any prepared jam you like, though something on the less sweet side works best. Or bake the cornmeal scones unfilled. They are moist, lightly sweet and perfectly satisfying all on their own.

Featured in:  Jammy Goodness From The Inside Out.
93 ratings ***** 

  Time 45 minutes
 Yield 8 scones


Ingredients
3 tablespoons/45 milliliters honey
1 bay leaf
¾ pound plums/1/3 kilogram, halved, pitted and then cut into 1-inch cubes
¾ cup/175 milliliters heavy cream, more as needed
1 large egg, at room temperature
1 2/3 cups/275 grams all-purpose flour
1/3 cup/60 grams fine cornmeal
3 tablespoons/35 grams sugar
2 teaspoons/7 grams baking powder
½ teaspoon/2 grams kosher salt
6 tablespoons/85 grams unsalted butter at room temperature, cubed, plus more for serving if you like

Preparation
1. Put honey and bay leaf in a medium skillet over medium heat. Simmer until honey is bubbling and turns a shade darker, about 2 minutes.
2. Place plums in honey. Cook, without moving, until undersides are golden brown, about 5 minutes. Stir plums and cook 1 to 2 minutes longer, until tender but not falling completely apart. If the caramel starts to get too brown, stir in a teaspoon or two of water and lower the heat. Scrape plums and syrup into a bowl and chill for at least 1 hour. (Plum compote can be made up to a week ahead.)
3. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment.
4. In a small bowl or measuring cup, mix together the cream and egg.
5. In a large bowl, whisk together flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder and salt (or you can do this in a food processor). Using a fork, pastry cutter or your fingertips, cut butter into flour until the mixture forms coarse crumbs (or pulse in a food processor). Drizzle in as much of the cream mixture as you need to make a smooth, moist but not wet dough. Save remaining cream-egg mixture for brushing.
6. Turn dough out onto prepared baking sheet. Pat into a 1 1/4-inch thick round. Using a paring knife, cut 8 wedge-shaped scones (as though you were cutting slices of pie) and push them apart on the baking sheet to separate them 1/2 inch apart. Brush dough with remaining cream-egg mixture, or use more cream if you’ve run out of the mixture.
7. Using your fingertips, make a deep indentation about 1 inch in diameter in the center of each scone. Tuck some plum into the hole. Transfer pan to oven and bake until uniformly golden brown, 15 to 17 minutes. Cool 5 minutes on the pan, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely. Serve scones with extra plum compote and butter on the side if you like.

 http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1016842-cornmeal-plum-scones

Peach Crumble Slab Pie






Juicy, fruit-filled, buttery and gently spiced, this recipe splits the difference between a peach pie and a crumble: a flaky, all-butter crust is a bed for the jammy sliced peaches, but a cinnamon-scented crumble tops it all off. Even better, this recipe feeds a crowd, making it ideal for toting to a picnic or barbeque. When peaches and nectarines aren’t in season, you can make this with a mix of plums and blueberries, cherries or ripe sweet pears. It’s best eaten after it cools on the day you bake it, but no one will turn it down the next day, either.

Featured in:  The Future Looks Peachy.
132 ratings ***** 

 Yield 12 to 16 servings
 
Ingredients
For the crust:

2 ½ cups/325 grams all-purpose flour, more as needed
¾ teaspoon/4 grams fine sea salt
2 ½ sticks/10 ounces/285 grams cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
4 to 6 tablespoons ice water, as needed
For the filling:
6 pounds ripe peaches, nectarines or a mix, pitted and cut into 1 1/2-inch chunks [3 kg]
1 ¼ cups/135 grams packed light brown sugar, more to taste
1/3 cup/50 grams instant tapioca
 Zest of 3 lemons
3 tablespoons/45 milliliters fresh lemon juice
1 ½ teaspoons/5 grams finely grated nutmeg
1 vanilla bean, split lengthwise and seeds scraped, or 1 teaspoon/5 milliliters vanilla extract
1 teaspoon/6 grams fine sea salt
For the crumble topping:
1 ½ cups/195 grams all-purpose flour
1 cup/189 grams packed dark brown sugar
2 teaspoons/10 grams ground cinnamon
1 ½ teaspoons/3 grams ground ginger
½ teaspoon/3 grams fine sea salt
1 ½ sticks/6 ounces/170 grams unsalted butter, cubed

Preparation
For the crust:
1. In a food processor, briefly pulse together flour and salt. Add butter and pulse until mixture forms chickpea-size pieces (6 to 8 1-second pulses). Add ice water 1 tablespoon at a time and pulse until mixture is just moist enough to hold together. Form dough into a large ball. Wrap with plastic and flatten into a disk. Refrigerate at least 1 hour.
2. Using a lightly floured rolling pin, gently roll out dough to an 11-x-15-inch rectangle, dusting with flour if dough is sticking. Fold dough in half and transfer to a 9-x-13-inch baking dish. Carefully press crust into the bottom of the pan and completely up the edges so it’s flush with the top of the pan (you don’t need to crimp the dough). Return crust to refrigerator while you prepare the filling and crumble topping.
For the filling:
1. In a large bowl, toss together peaches, sugar, tapioca, lemon zest and juice, nutmeg, vanilla and salt. Let stand 20 to 30 minutes. Taste and add a little more sugar if needed.
2. Meanwhile, heat oven to 425 degrees. Place a large rimmed baking sheet on the oven floor to preheat. Arrange one oven rack on the lowest position and a second rack in the center position.
For the crumble topping:
1. Whisk together flour, sugar, cinnamon, ginger and salt. Mix in butter with your fingertips until mixture is uniformly moist and comes together in large clumps.
2. Spoon filling into crust and top with crumble. Move baking sheet to the lowest rack and place pie on baking sheet. Bake 15 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 375 degrees. Move baking sheet with pie to the center rack. Continue baking until pie is golden brown and filling is bubbling, about 1 hour. Transfer to a wire rack to cool completely before slicing. Note: Measurements for dry ingredients are given by metric weight for greater accuracy. The equivalent measurements by volume are approximate.

http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1016691-peach-crumble-slab-pie

Friday, February 12, 2016

Chicken Cutlets with Mushroom Dressing






The pinot noirs of the Côte Chalonnaise on the southern end of Burgundy come to the table with grace. They are fresh and balanced, perhaps with a hint of smoke, especially in the delightful Rullys we tasted. I thought of coq au vin alongside, but that dish wants a more muscular Burgundy, like Chambertin, so I went lighter, omitting the lardons and wine sauce and turning some dark thigh meat into cutlets, or schnitzels, dressed with mushrooms flavored with lemon and strong mustard. After all, Dijon, the mustard capital, represents Burgundy, too. If you’d prefer to fry the chicken 30 minutes or so in advance and keep it in the oven at 175 degrees, go right ahead.
You can find more of our best chicken thigh recipes here.

Featured in:  A Peek At The Promised Land. 
 Yield 4 to 6 servings

Ingredients
3 tablespoons lemon juice
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
4 cloves garlic, minced
6 boneless, skinless chicken thighs, about 2 pounds, pounded flat
 Salt and ground black pepper
6 sprigs fresh thyme plus 1 tablespoon thyme leaves
1/3 cup chopped shallots [60 g]
12 ounces small button mushrooms, quartered [336 g]
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
¼ cup dry white wine [63 g]
1 tablespoon good quality balsamic vinegar
1/3 cup flour [43 g]
2 eggs, beaten
¾ cup dry bread crumbs
4 tablespoons grapeseed oil
6 lemon wedges

Preparation
1. Combine lemon juice, half the olive oil and half the garlic in a shallow dish that can hold chicken in a single layer. Add chicken, turn to coat, dust with salt and pepper and top with thyme sprigs. Cover and refrigerate about 6 hours.
2. About 45 minutes before serving, heat remaining olive oil in a 10-inch skillet. Add shallots and remaining garlic and sauté on medium until soft. Add mushrooms and sauté, stirring, until they are moist and softened, starting to color and have exuded juices. Shut off heat. Dissolve mustard in wine and mix in vinegar. Reheat mushrooms, add mustard mixture and cook on medium-high until liquid has reduced to thickness of heavy cream. Season with salt and pepper; remove from heat.
3. Place flour in a shallow bowl, eggs in another bowl and bread crumbs in a third. Discard thyme sprigs from chicken. Dip chicken thighs, 1 at a time, lightly in flour, then egg, then crumbs to coat both sides. Set on a plate. Heat grapeseed oil in a large skillet, preferably cast iron. Sauté chicken cutlets on medium until golden brown, about 3 minutes per side in 2 shifts. Remove to a serving platter as they are done. Tent with foil to keep warm.
4. Reheat mushrooms and add thyme leaves. Place some mushroom mixture on each cutlet along with a lemon wedge and serve.

http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1017226-chicken-cutlets-with-mushroom-dressing

Chicken Wings With Guajillo Anchovy Sauce






At Ducks Eatery in the East Village, the chef, Will Horowitz, believes in the bar snack as a maximum-detonation flavor bomb. And he’ll go to great lengths to achieve that: Many of the dishes at Ducks, including the restaurant's wings, shown here, depend on labor-intensive rounds of fermenting and smoking. For our version of the recipe, though, we asked him to reel in the effort without cutting back on the flavor. Think of the result (which involves anchovy fillets, Thai fish sauce, guajillo chiles, ancho chiles and ground chamomile) as a stealth way to sneak ambitious gastronomy into your next Super Bowl party.

Featured in:  The Chicken Wing Boom. 
15 ratings ****
 Yield 4 servings

Ingredients
For brining the wings:
¼ cup brown sugar [55 g]
¼ cup kosher salt
¼ cup lemon juice [63 ml]
2 tablespoons granulated sugar [25 g]
2 tablespoons Thai fish sauce
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon smoked paprika
3 garlic cloves, peeled
 Stems from 1 bunch fresh cilantro
16 large whole chicken wings
For the guajillo sauce:
3 dried guajillo chiles
1 dried ancho chile
5 garlic cloves, peeled
1 small shallot, roughly chopped
1 ½ teaspoons soy sauce
1 ½ teaspoons Thai fish sauce
1 ½ tablespoons freshly ground black pepper
 Rinds and pulp of 2 juiced lemons, coarsely chopped
¼ teaspoon smoked paprika
6 white anchovy fillets
1 tablespoon finely ground chamomile flowers (finely ground pure chamomile “tea” may be
used)
½ cup fresh lemon juice
1 ½ teaspoons kosher salt, or to taste
To roast and serve:
¼ cup melted clarified butter or ghee
 Zest of 1 whole fresh lemon, or finely diced rind of 1 brined lemon
 Coarsely chopped leaves from 1 bunch cilantro, for garnish

Preparation
Brine the wings:
1. In a large bowl, combine the brown sugar, kosher salt, lemon juice, granulated sugar, fish sauce, soy sauce and smoked paprika. Add 2 quarts of water and mix well. Add the garlic, cilantro stems and chicken wings. Mix, cover, and refrigerate for 7 to 14 hours.
2. Remove wings from marinade, rinse and transfer to a sheet pan with a rack. Allow to sit uncovered until dry and slightly tacky to the touch, 30 to 45 minutes.
Prepare the guajillo sauce:
1. Cut stem and cap off the guajillo and ancho chiles and remove the seeds; if the chiles are very brittle, warm them briefly in a skillet to soften. Sauté in a dry skillet until the skins change color and begin to smoke heavily, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer to a container and cover with hot water. Soak until softened, 30 to 45 minutes.
2. Drain chiles and place in a food processor. Add garlic, shallot, soy sauce, fish sauce, black pepper, lemons, smoked paprika, white anchovies, chamomile, lemon juice and salt. Purée until smooth.
To roast and serve:
1. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Brush wings with butter or ghee and roast until the internal temperature reaches 160 degrees, about 20 minutes. (Alternatively, the wings could be smoked with your choice of wood at 225 degrees for 2 1/2 hours.)
2. Baste wings again with butter or ghee, increase oven temperature to 450 and continue to roast until the skins are brown and crispy, 10 to 15 minutes more. (Alternatively, the wings may be deep-fried at 350 degrees until golden brown and crisp, 8 to 10 minutes.) Allow wings to rest at room temperature for 10 minutes.
3. To serve, slather wings with a generous amount of guajillo sauce and top with fresh lemon zest or brined lemon peel and a generous sprinkling of cilantro.

http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1016874-chicken-wings-with-guajillo-anchovy-sauce